New Sign

I kept very busy over the holiday break at the farm (more on that later). One of the things that I did was to put up a new sign. I had it made from cast aluminum and it is powder coated so it should last for pretty close to forever. Longer than me, anyhow.

The sign pays tribute to the previous owner of the farm, Gary Larson. He did such impressive work around the property and you could tell he was always looking for little ways to improve it. We felt it was appropriate to make sure that his legacy lived on at this place and so his name is on there. I did make one stupid mistake though; he actually established the place in 1990, not 1997, although I unfortunately did not notice this error (my fault) until after the sign had been cast. It’s nearly impossible to fix at this point and I suppose it another forty years those few seven years won’t matter too much anyhow. Originally Gary called the place “Daybreak Ranch.” He told me that at the time him and his wife were both working and had to get up early to take care of the horses, at the crack of dawn. In addition, the main home faces east and so “Daybreak”, with its double meaning, became the name. The “ranch” part is presumably because of the horses. Since we don’t have horses and I don’t plan to get any, we decided to change that part to “farm” instead. So “Daybreak Farm” is the name; it has a bit of heritage to it and it’s also our own.

The sign itself is really heavy. Even though it’s aluminum, it’s a lot of it. It weighs just over 100 pounds. It has eight studs in the back of it that I connected into 2x6s which are in turn lag-bolted into the upright beams; one is a burly old 6×6 and the other is two 2x4s joined in an L shape. I suspect I may end up strengthening those 2x4s by adding a 4×4 behind them at some point although they’re working fine for now. All of the wood is covered in an oil-based sealer / stain which should help it survive in our soggy weather. Above it I mounted two solar powered lights for nighttime illumination.

Here is what the new sign looks like, mounted in place:

I had to cut down a nasty looking holly bush that was in my way when I was hanging it. It’s a little hard to get a sense of scale from this picture; the sign is about six feet wide and a little over two feet tall if I recall correctly.

Below is the original sign that we replaced. I think I’ll put this one up in the barn. You can see the big gnarly holly bush in this photo.

Progress on the terracing

This may come as a surprise; it turns out that it is shockingly hard work to build a 130′ long, 3′ high dry stack rock wall. Digging the trench for the footer alone was a massive task; it had to be around 2.5′ wide and 2′ deep and we dug it all by hand. Then 6″ of 3/4 clean gravel was added to the bottom (I used the tractor for most of this!) for drainage. We still haven’t finished setting the first course of rock. We have about 40 tons of one-man granite rocks piled in the front yard waiting to go into place although my attention has been taken lately with some interior remodeling and leak-fixing so this project has been sitting idle. Here are a few pictures of the beginnings:

Remaking the Garden – Terracing

After spending some time tearing down the small, older garden (while preserving the old grape vine) I became frustrated with how hilly (not to mention rocky!) our yard is and so I decided to terrace it.

The thinking is to build a natural stone retaining wall and then fill in the low spots with dirt brought in from outside. The first step is to stake out the terraced area and then run level twine between the stakes to get a sense of how high the retaining walls would need to be and how much dirt to bring in. Here’s the surveying work in progress:

It seems that we’ll need about 1,000 yards of soil to level this up. And lots and lots of rocks!

Making Hay Part 2

The plan has been to turn this part of the pasture into a hay field so we can harvest and store it and our sheep will have healthy food to eat next winter.

The first step is to set up the tractor with the plow:

And then, start plowing:

This can actually be a little bit of a nerve-wracking process, especially on very hilly and uneven ground like our pasture. The reason is that after making the first furrow it’s necessary to put the two tractor tires on the right side into that furrow to do the second one and then keep repeating this process. This means the tractor can be titling to one side in a fairly dramatic fashion at times. The last thing I want to do is roll the tractor.

So after a couple of hours I had this done.

And then a bit later, all done:

Next step is that my sister will be planting the hay seeds. Apparently it’s some kind of mix from a local seed company… I’ll update with more information about that later.

Remaking the Garden – Day 1

The front lawn of the main house has a triangle shaped yard, bordered on either side by the driveway which loops around the back of the house. Down near the tip of the triangle is the garden shed and a nice (although small) garden with a mature grape vine, some berries, and flowers. It’s fenced in to prevent deer from eating the plants. We have decided to remake the front yard and the first step is removing this small fenced garden and plowing the lower portion of this triangle. We have finalized our future plans yet although we’re thinking an English style mostly edible garden, possibly with terracing rather than having the sloping grade as it is now.

Demo’ing the existing garden proved to be hard work. The person who built it could have been using it as a small prison. For dinosaurs. It’s had ten foot posts in two foot deep holes, spread about six feet apart all the way around. These were wrapped in a fairly heavy gauge wire fencing material which was secured using the largest brads I’ve ever seen. They were like U-shaped 16 penny nails. But even once the fencing was removed I would also have to take apart the planter beds which were made out creosote telephone pole sections… pinned into the ground using three feet of rebar. Serious overkill for a flower garden.

The garden before I started

I removed all of the fencing by hand. Initially I was going very slowly and removing the brads in order to preserve the fencing material. This was taking WAY too long and was extremely tiring and tedious. I changed tact and started snipping the fencing material at the poles. It will still be useful in the future, albeit for smaller jobs.

Once the fencing was moved and the poles were taken down, I fired up the tractor to remove those giant, heavy creosote telephone poles. I used the tractor bucket to lift and pry them and once I get one corner off the ground a bit I would wrap a chain under it, connect the chain to the tractor, and drag it away from the garden area. This was tough work and required some careful finessing with the tractor. Just before the sun went down I had all of the poles removed and pulled over to a storage area.

Tomorrow I will plow this garden under (except the grape vine; that stays) as well as about half of the front yard. Then on to the new hayfield.

Roots

All of my great-grandparents came to the USA through Ellis Island between about 1890 and 1917. This weekend Xingyu and I were in NY so we decided to finally visit. What a different experience it was for immigrants coming to the USA at that time; they show up on a boat and, if admitted, they’re now citizens. Compared to the hoopla people go through today to live here it’s remarkable. At the same time it must have been terrifying knowing there’s a chance you could be sent back, especially considering many people spent their life savings on that boat ride.

The building itself is very welcoming and doesn’t have the bureaucratic and cold feeling of modern government offices. The fact that it’s so close to Liberty Island really adds to the experience. I guess it makes sense now why they called this the island of tears and joy. I’ll post better pictures once I get them from Xingyu’s fancy camera… here are a few from my phone:

The main hall where immigrants were processed for entry
Lady Liberty and the pedestal taken from Liberty Island
Liberty Island with lower Manhattan in the background as seen from the boat heading to Ellis Island.

A Thought on Defending America’s Minds

I had an interesting conversation over dinner with a friend who happens to work in tech as well. I have often joked that Facebook has destroyed the world. What I mean by that specifically is that it seems that the echo-chamber effect of self-reinforcing technology wherein users are (1) provided with content determined by an algorithm to be favorable to them, (2) able to block people that disagree with them, and (3) provided with confirmation bias through searching for agreements has created an environment wherein meaningful discourse is impossible. It has created hyper-sensitive people with vitriolic anger. I would go so far as to say that it’s a significant contributor to populism (in combination with a number of economic factors, of course… let’s call it a catalyst).

We cannot (and should not) ban “fake news” or even hateful speech. However, what we could reasonably ban would be behavioral targeting and personalization. What this means is that a person’s behavior online could not be used to further drive their behavior online. It means that if a person were to go on YouTube and look at a puppy video then the next time they went on YouTube they would not be swarmed with pet videos; they would get the same home page experience as everyone else. Of course, this would break much of online advertising as we know it. I do not think that anyone would consider this to be a terrible thing except for Google and Facebook and the other companies that make a living by hoarding personal information in order to market things to consumers that analysts have determined that they will like based on the specific cohort(s) that they have been grouped into.

It also means that when viewing a news website, users will see the same content as everyone else… no more personalized newsfeeds. I believe that these changes would go a long way to improve people’s interactions with one another. I suspect that the government’s intervention in making this a law could be constitutionally defensible… I imagine there is some argument to be made in here that this represents a greater freedom of speech. However, even if the government never had the appetite to step into this, individuals could make these choices for themselves by opting out of systems that use personalization and behavioral targeting (i.e. basically anything “free” on the internet). It sounds wild, although it is not overreaching to say that this could make the world a better place.

Getting ready to make hay, pt 1

My sister and I decided to grow our own hay for the sheep. This winter we’ll have to buy it, although if we start the growing process now then next winter we won’t have to. Plus, it seems the highest quality hay gets shipped to Japan mostly and is very expensive here. I think we’ll write a separate post all about hay, this one is about the tools to make it.

We’re starting out with a 12″ plow for the tractor. I bought one with a depth guide wheel and a cutting wheel since this ground has never been plowed before and we’ll have to cut through existing vegetation. Here’s the plow that I purchased for our John Deere 1026R compact tractor:

It’s a “land shark” brand, made in the USA, and designed specifically for a tractor like ours (25 hp). It hooks to the three point hitch which will need to be adjusted to stay steady via the turnbuckles. The videos always make it look easy although I’m sure it will be a trial and error affair. I’ll post pictures of our plowed field once the implement arrives and we get to use it. We’ll also be using this to expand the garden beds.